Revolutionary Girl Utena - Recommendations

Alt title: Shoujo Kakumei Utena

If you're looking for anime similar to Revolutionary Girl Utena, you might like these titles.

The Rose of Versailles

The Rose of Versailles

Since General de Jarjayes of France’s Royal Guard always wanted a son, he brings up his only daughter Oscar to dress, fight, and behave like a man. When Oscar’s excellent swordsmanship wins her the honored position as bodyguard to Louis XVI’s new bride, Marie Antoinette, the Jarjayes household believes it can finally be proud. However, what nobody realizes is the pit of thorns the royal court in Versailles has become – with all its excessive opulence, it attracts not just those with status and wealth, but also those with ruthless ambition. To confound matters, Marie Antoinette turns out to be an airhead whose selfish actions are turning the starving population against her. Amidst the sordid schemes and terrible tragedies, and with the tide of history sweeping against the nobles, can Oscar protect her new King and Queen whilst upholding justice for the oppressed peasants of France?

15 votes

I agree

Reasons you might like The Rose of Versailles...

Zadillo Zadillo says...

The flowery style is almost identical, and you should enjoy the female heroine who is acting like a man in some ways.

kamirura kamirura says...

A girl who wants to be a man... and dresses that way too. Just like Utena this young woman is a strong girl who wants to change the world and help the weak ones. This series doesn't contain any magic and is alot more realistic than Utena and contains more drama too. So if you're looking for something more serious and abit more depressing be sure to check this one out.

Nocturnalgloria Nocturnalgloria says...

Rose of Versailles and Revolutionary Girl Utena bring to the front the issues of gender identity. The titular heroines in these series choose to take on traditionally male roles which create a tension in these characters as they struggle to conciliate feelings with duty. In both series there is a recurring theme of roses and sword fighting; they both deal with Revolutions albeit of a very different nature and are concerned with moral nobility. Rose of Versailles has a more social and linear approach while Utena spins into a heavy psychological study that renders narrative almost obsolete. Breaking through illusions, be them class based or emotional hang-ups, is at the heart of these two anime.

Bonnie Bonnie says...

Shoujo Kakumei Utena and Versailles no Bara are two of the most influential anime shoujo series of all time, and they both MADE a difference. Although they are very different series and have a time gap of around 15 years, they have some common roots that will make at least some of the people who enjoyed one, enjoy the other. It's obvious that Versailles no Bara had a big impact on the concept of Shoujo Kakumei Utena.

The main characters of both Shoujo Kakumei Utena and Versailles no Bara have similar principles: one can say that Oscar is Utena's parent - even though being females, both of them dress as males and have quite the manly part in the series. They fight with swords and they look amazingly good in their uniforms. Other common points are the pointy and classy character designs, the amazingly complex love schemes, the troubled relationships, the gorgeous and short fighting scenes and, most important of all, the thousands and thousands of roses, everywhere.

If you watched one of these series, you might want to check on the other one. They're very different, but it's very obvious that one had a great impact on the other.

Pippin4242 Pippin4242 says...

Although the creators of 'Revolutionary Girl Utena' claim not to have viewed 'The Rose of Versailles', this claim frankly lacks credibility, for the one owes much to the other. These two tales of free-spirited young women who embrace the spirit of masculine battle without giving up their identity as women challenge popular conception of gender and chivalry, often using roses as a symbolic motif. However, 'The Rose of Versailles' ('Berubara' to fans) focuses strongly on the historical aspect of its story, exploring such real-life events as the arrival of Marie Antoinette at the court of Versailles, the affair of the diamond necklace, and the French Revolution, while 'Revolutionary Girl Utena' is a frequently surreal trip through the psyches of its diverse school-based cast. Both are absolutely fascinating anime, and quite significant markers in the history of shoujo anime. The one is unmissable if you liked the other.

ohtoriakio ohtoriakio says...

The seires are both about strong women who stand against adversity and both also have a theme of breaking gender bounderies. The director of Utena (Ikuhara) himself states that ROV was a great influence in making the series

reccaphoenix reccaphoenix says...

Utena is a direct "successor" to Oscar - they are both honourable duelists who put their battles above men and don't let their gender keep them from doing what they want to.  They even share a similar style.  Both of these series have great duels and character interactions.

VivisQueen VivisQueen says...

Rose of Versailles and Revolutionary Girl Utena share similar key themes of women cross-dressing to be heroes, struggling against their traditional gender roles, and trying to overcome the sexism of their peers. They also convey similar stylistic touches of shimmering eyes, limp-limbed bodies, and vibrant pastel colours.

foxhead556 foxhead556 says...

Both have a unique character being females but dress and act like men. As for story Utena is a bit more fantasy as opposed to Rose of Versailles. But overall you can say that Utena is the daughter of Oscar with their similar traits.

snivets snivets says...

Here are two anime with similar main characters (female dressing like a male) and similar flowery art styles. They have totally different plots, yet both heavily utilize jealousy as a driving force in the characters' actions.

hunnybeee hunnybeee says...

Both Rose of Versailles and Shoujo Kakumei Utena's main characters dress and act like men.Both characters are linked with roses and they both fight with swords.

McGreddy McGreddy says...

Both explore themes of gender and sexuality, both heavily utilize roses, both heavily utilize sword duels.

HoopoeBird HoopoeBird says...

Both feature strong female characters that dress as men. Both are dramas and feature shoujo elements.

animekid95 animekid95 says...

So the differences between anime such as revolutionary girl utena and The Rose of Versailles is that they are both different from each other but the same flower style design in Revolutionary Girl Utena looks very similar to The Rose of Versailles in very of many different ways from each anime series.

CreamCat CreamCat says...

RoV inspired multiple of the elements seen in Utena. While ROV is more of a historical anime Utena is more magically inclined and it's story uses a lot of subtext and symbology. 

Both heavily deal with themes of gender and sexuality, with Utena being a bit heavier in that regard.

If you liked one then the other is definitely worth checking out!🌟

Princess Tutu

Princess Tutu

Once there lived an eccentric author called Drosselmeyer who wrote grand tragedies - one of them was the tale of a prince who sealed away an evil raven by breaking his own heart into tiny pieces. However, before the story could be completed, the author died and the tale took on a life of its own. Now, in a town where fiction and reality meet, the story continues on its tragic course with Ahiru, a duck who transforms into the beautiful Princess Tutu in order to restore the prince's heart. But will Ahiru's act of love be enough to defy the story's terrible destiny and lead to a happy ending?

10 votes

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Reasons you might like Princess Tutu...

Antic Antic says...

I've seen Revolutionary Girl Utena described as a ‘postmodern fairy tale', Princess Tutu as a 'meta-fairy tale', and after watching both series, I'd say those descriptions are about as close as you're going to get in trying to describe either series. Both have a certain surreal/fantastic quality to their stories, and continuously take and invert fairy tale archetypes. Even aspects of the presentation of the story are similar- the ‘once upon a time' segments present at the beginning of several Utena episodes and every Princess Tutu episode, or the role of the shadow play girls (in Utena), which is comparable to the role of Edel or Drosselmeyer (in Tutu). While Utena is the single weirdest show I've managed to watch all the way through, it certainly doesn't have the monopoly- a fan of one series would likely enjoy the other.

Nocturnalgloria Nocturnalgloria says...

Princess Tutu and Revolutionary Girl Utena are fairytales that subvert archetypes even when they seem to reinforce them. In both there is much more than meets the eye and illusions abound. They are self-conscious narratives about finding one's own role and being true to it through thick and thin. Often surreal and increasingly dark, these two titles are a perfect match that push the limits of shoujo with great musical tracks and gripping visuals.

Sphinx Sphinx says...

The plots in Utena and Tutu are both thought-provoking and mysteriously unraveled. There are duels in both that further the plot in a symbolically charged way. They both take a sort of symbolic look at valiant young women. Utena plays more with Hegel and Jung, and Tutu more with mythology and ballet/music, but both make you think and feel for the characters--and occasionally confuse you, but in a good way.

ehood ehood says...

Both are series that start out a bit on the lighter more child friendly side but slowly transform to a darker and more sinister series than when they began. Both contain fairytale like elements and a general theme of wanting to protect/save someone. Both have strange and often sisnister narrirators, in RGU we have the Shadow Player Girls who's random before battle skits often offer deeper insight into the duel or duelist while Drosselmier plays the twisted writer commenting on his work as it plays out. A fan of one would and should watch and enjoy the other.

ohtoriakio ohtoriakio says...

Both series explore gender stereotypes that are present in classic fairytales and turn them on their head by having a female as the hero.

Piu Piu says...

The main characters in both of the series are both female, trying to be something they are not (a girl who aims to be a prince or a duck who wants to be a balerina) and they both have their own prince(s).

The stories takes place in a private academy, combining everyday school life with a deeper, fairytale-like story running next to it. The fun, everyday part is more dominant in the beginning, but it get's darker and more twisted by the end.

There is a lot of symbolic elements in both, some of whitch are hard to understand, but they spice up the story and give it even more depth.

Both series tend to repeat scenes, which can get annoying, but this actually gives a lot to the feel of a modern fairy tale and in most cases those scenes are meant to symbolise something.

Both animes also share an unexpected ending.

Karmillina Karmillina says...

Princes, Princesses, and Fairytales... Princess Tutu and Shoujo Kakumei Utena cover them both beautifully. If you're looking for a story where things are never how they seemed and where everything is more complex than you thought, topped with gorgeous character designs, epic music, and dreamy settings, you will adore these two series.

VivisQueen VivisQueen says...

Both Revolutionary Girl Utena and Princess Tutu take the mahou shoujo format and weave something sophisticated and refreshing out of it. Utena is bizarre ad heavy on symbolism while Tutu has more coherence and is more approachable, but both reveal a revelatory side to mahou shoujo we never thought was possible.

Gavia Gavia says...

Revolutionary Girl Utena and Princess Tutu both take classical fairy tale elements and use them to make something unique, but recognizable.

Both begin with an almost monster-of-the-week type plot mixed with fun, school-life and move on to be quite a bit darker than one might expect.

Princess Tutu is definitely more approachable, since Utena is the type of show you need to pay proper attention to to enjoy. (Otherwise you might just end up mind-f***ed.)

AnnaSartin AnnaSartin says...

Stories of heroines that must attempt to rescue a prince under highly unusual circumstances that they are partly in the dark about.

Penguindrum

Penguindrum

Kamba and Shouma Takakura have taken care of their sickly younger sister Himari since their parents disappeared years ago - that is, until the day she died. But as the boys grieve by her hospital bed, Himari sits up, adorned with a strange penguin hat. Suddenly, the three of them are transported to a vibrant world where the hat, using Himari's body as a puppet, charges these brothers with a task: find the Penguin Drum and their sister's life will be saved! Now aided by some odd penguins they received in the mail, the duo must find this mysterious item or risk losing the sister they care for so much. However, they aren't the only ones with their sights on the Penguin Drum, for new enemies await them around every turn, all connected in ways they would have never imagined...

8 votes

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Reasons you might like Penguindrum...

Rariru Rariru says...

Both of these animes portray the concept of 'Destiny' in a similar way and manner and in both of them the protagonists are fated to battle or compete with each other "for the bigger picture" in order to achieve a certain goal benefitial for their personal interests.The battlefield is set/the conflicts are caused by a mysterious figure with dubious motives whose true objective isn't clear until the very end.Plotwise they are almost identical.Another common trait they share is the dynamic and symbolic randomness which is used to give depth and impact to the psychological element prevalent in the story.Kunihiko Ikuhara directed both.

KapiTezuka KapiTezuka says...

Aside from being directed by the same person, the concept of fate, its supposed inevitability and the ones who stand up against it and fight to change it, has a similar feel in it. Also it has a similar nice touch of absurdity one might remember from Utena.

AirCommodore AirCommodore says...

Both of these series concern the concept of fate, play with shoujo tropes, have excellent characters/characterization, treat very serious subjects with an impressive amount of nuance and tact, and can go from goofy to dead serious at the drop of a hat.

Gavia Gavia says...

Some series makes you think, they have plots that take cues from deep philosophical discussions. Some series take the philosophy and symbolisms one step further, forcing you to spend time thinking about what any of it actually meant. Mawaru Penguindrum and Revolutionary Girl Utena fits both of these categories. The nature of fate is mixed with vague backstories and large helpings of animations that obviously symbolise something. Both have interesting characters and lovely settings, if you like one of them you'll surely enjoy the other.

snivets snivets says...

I think the plot/themes of both these shows get lost in excessive and obtuse symbolism, but both explore the workings of destiny and the power of humans to overcome their own fate.

softbank47 softbank47 says...

Both feature the same director, and Penguindrum is clearly influenced by its forerunner Utena. They are full of symbolism, obtuse imagery, motifs, and strong female characters. Both also have a penchant for recycling the same transformation sequence for many, many episodes.

VivisQueen VivisQueen says...

Mawaru Penguindrum and Revolutionary Girl Utena share the same director, which explains the similarities: repeat transformation sequences, unconventional romance, absolutely beautiful character designs, pastel colours, a highly abstract world concept, and lots of confusion about What It All Means. If you enjoyed wrapping your brain around either of these beautifully crafted surrealist shows, then the other will offer plenty more delight.

TheHabbadasher TheHabbadasher says...

Utena and Penguindrum were both directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara in what appears to be his trademark style. There're similarities aplenty both as far as plot and visuals are concerned.Both shows have a theatrical feeling to them. Their stories are told through visual metaphors. The viewer is left to derive their own meaning from the images shown on-screen. If you enjoy one you'll definitely like the other.

Dear Brother

Dear Brother

No sooner has Nanako Misonoo started attending Seiran, the most prestigious girls’ school in Japan, when she is unexpectedly chosen to join its most exclusive club, the Sorority. Believing that she was given preferential treatment by the Sorority’s leader, the beautiful and intimidating Miya-sama, Nanako’s jealous classmates begin to bully her. Slowly, life at Seiran begins to unravel and Nanako wonders why the Sorority chose her over more eligible candidates. Not only that, what could lie behind Miya-sama’s mysterious smile? With only the letters to her ‘dear brother’ to help her make sense of it all, Nanako must try to find answers to these and many more questions.

5 votes

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Reasons you might like Dear Brother...

Ajna Ajna says...

Both anime feature likeable yet naive heroines, exclusive societies, and forbidden homosexual and/or incestuous relationships. Both heroines have perky, pony-tailed best friends whose ordinariness gradually precludes them from the encroaching melodrama. Both series also feature handsome, melancholic blondes who cling to pieces of gold jewelry that serve as painful reminders of their unrequited loves for other women. In both series, female characters are referred to as "princes," and roses play symbolic roles.

Ellstar Ellstar says...

Both Revolutionary Girl Utena and Brother Dear Brother deal with the complexities of gender, sexuality and identity. While Utena is more fantasy-based, Brother Dear Brother is quite realistic, but the emotions that both shows draw upon are very similar. While the leads in both shows are quite different in their strengths, their core personalities are quite similar. The classical music component is shared between the two, creating similar musical themes too.

andrael andrael says...

In a lot of ways, Brother, Dear Brother feels like a spiritual predecessor to Utena.  Both have a classy private school setting, a large cast of primary, secondary, and tertiary characters, dark secrets, complex motivations, twisted relationships, and a unique atmosphere created by combining lush shoujo imagery and visual symbolism with music.  Oh yeah, and lesbians.

VivisQueen VivisQueen says...

If what you're looking for is more high school melodrama about female adolescence and maturing sexuality, psychological trauma, and a dash of bitshiness, then watch Brother, Dear Brother after Utena. The former has no fantastical elements and is arguably less surreal, but their stylistic approaches seem quite similar.

hunnybeee hunnybeee says...

While Utena is a post modern fairytale fantasy and Oniisama e is a retro high school drama, these two shows are more similar than it seems. Both of them have strong and not very girly female characters and work around some very touchy subjects. In a way, both shows are about a certain type of coming of age revolution. Utena shows that revolution in a more symbolic and supernatural way, while Oniisma e doesn't add those fantasy elements. 

Kill La Kill

Kill La Kill

Ryuuko Matoi is a fiery, feisty girl on a vengeful mission: she’ll find her father’s murderer at all costs, with only a giant red scissor blade as a clue to the villain’s whereabouts. Using the item as a weapon, she fights her way into the terrifying Honnouji Academy to track down a lead, unaware that the institute is brutally governed by a student council that’s anything but ordinary. Wielding special “Goku uniforms”, the group, led by president Satsuki, uses superpowers to keep the student body in check - but things are about to change now that Ryuuko’s in town!

5 votes

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Reasons you might like Kill La Kill...

Taek Taek says...

It may not seem like an obvious reccomendation but lets check off a few things. Evil student council? Check. Ambiguously evil council president? Check. Themes of female empowerment? Check. Themes about sexuality and gender roles? Check and check. Although Utena is an anime that relies on a more subtle approach to these themes, with minimal to no fanservice, and a plot that is best described as fantastically artistic, Kill la Kill is a much faster paced joy ride through debauchery and awesome, it shows you what it wants to show you, which is as much as the creators are physically able to fit in, while all the time holding something back.

I do think that a fan of one, can appreciate the same sentiments in the other, and realise the 2 very different approaches along the same themes, and enjoy both.

HasseRovdjur HasseRovdjur says...

Utena and Kill la Kill both use a lot of the same themes, even though they differ a lot in execution and approach. Still, both are focused on female empowerment, friendship (and more, in the case of Utena) and standing up against the oppressive student council in forms of duels. There is a varied cast in both, a lot of transformation sequences and generally lavish visuals to keep things interesting.

FloralFawn FloralFawn says...

My favorite part about Utena is her badassness and unrelenting perseverance to continue moving forward. Heroins in Utena and Kill La Kill really have a strong nerve and will do whatever it takes to achieve their goal. Both stories start off rather mysteriously and each herion must fight her way forward through a series of obstacles to understand the true meaning behind strange events.

Blackmagebrad Blackmagebrad says...

There are similar motifs here of:

-Emotional abuse by elder figures

-Complicated measures of sexuality and consent

-Emotionally stunted, aggressive, delniquent-ish main character girls who go to a school and get in fights with the student council who are themselves being manipulated by a higher power.

RG RG says...

Sword wielding female protagonist against a powerful school council with the goal to bring revolution to the world.

Neon Genesis Evangelion

Neon Genesis Evangelion

In the future, a devastating event known as Second Impact has destroyed Tokyo as we know it, giving rise to Tokyo III - a city under siege by mysterious lifeforms known only as Angels. Mankind's only line of defense are the Evangelions, a set man-made machines piloted by a trio of fourteen year-old teenagers, Rei, Shinji, and Asuka. The fate of Japan and the entire world now lie with these three children, though they might not have the power to save the most important thing of all: each other.

4 votes

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Reasons you might like Neon Genesis Evangelion...

PockyBebop PockyBebop says...

Evangelion has mess-with-your-mind moments that define the series and leaves you with a "WTF?" feeling. If you enjoyed those moments in Utena and want more, then watch Neon Genesis Evangelion. 

AirCommodore AirCommodore says...

I once heard Revolutionary Girl Utena described as "Evangelion for girls", and while I would argue against the assigning of demographic to each show based solely on gender, I'm inclined to agree with the general sentiment. Neither really starts off with much indication that it's gonna be REALLY WEIRD, but when that "What the dickens am I watching, and why is it so good?" feeling kicks in, it refuses to let up. Highly recommended, even if you don't think you'll like them, even if only because they're both "classics".

hunnybeee hunnybeee says...

Utena masks its deep philosophical themes with roses and sword fights while Evangelion does exactly the same with giant robots. However, the interesting part of both shows is not the flashy display of supernatural/sci-fi elements. It's the message they're trying to deliver through them and both shows succeed in that. In other words, if you like philosopy, symbolism and deep plots this is definitely going to be the show for you.

apocalypticGnostic apocalypticGnostic says...

They both desconstruct tropes, involve a lot of symbolism, and have a major tonal shift. Many of the themes they address are similar, such as growing up/coming of age and the cycles of abuse.

Sailor Moon S

Sailor Moon S

With the defeat of the Dark Moon clan, the future Crystal Tokyo is safe once again. As Usagi and Mamoru bid a sad farewell to their daughter from the future, Chibiusa, Rei senses a new danger lurking in the shadows. Along with the new monsters, the Sailor Senshi face two newcomers wearing similar Sailor Senshi outfits! Are they friend or foe? Will the two groups manage to put aside their differences to work together, or will the approaching silence destroy them all?

3 votes

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Reasons you might like Sailor Moon S...

Shirono Shirono says...

Kuniko Ikuhara, director of both Sailor Moon (parts) and Utena wanted to make a movie about Sailor Uranus and Neptune and a forcecalled the "End of the World." When he was relieved from his post with Sailor Moon without having made the movie, he and his Be-Papas team created Utena. The SM S Series features Haruka and Michiru, a lesbian couple who may have been a distant prototype, along with Rose of Versailles, of the heroines of Utena. Both SM S and Utena touch on gender roles and young women faced with a duty that throws thier plans for a "normal" life off track.

Nocturnalgloria Nocturnalgloria says...

Sailor Moon S, being one of the most serious instalments of the franchise, has some of the same dark overtones of Revolutionary Girl Utena. Both are classic shoujo that handle lesbian relationships that develop in a magical battle of sorts. Sailor Moon S does not reach the level of depth and weirdness of Revolutionary Girl Utena but both anime add nuances to the magical girl genre.

ohtoriakio ohtoriakio says...

Both from the same director and feature a similar atmosphere throughout. Ikuhara also commented that the Utena series started out from a concept for a subplot he had for Sailor Uranus and Neptune.

Star Driver

Star Driver

Star Driver takes place on the fictional Southern Cross Isle. One night, a boy named Takuto washes up on shore swimming from the mainland. He later enrolls in Southern Cross High School as a freshmen and makes new friends. However, beneath the school is a group of mysterious giants called Cybodies, which can be controlled by humans in an alternate dimension known as Zero Time. Takuto, The "Galactic Pretty Boy" , finds himself dragged into opposition with the "Glittering Crux Brigade". Glittering Star Cruciform Group), a mysterious group that intends to take possession of the island's Cybodies for their own purposes as well as break the seals of the island's four Shrine Maidens, whose powers prevent the Cybodies from functioning outside of Zero Time.

3 votes

I agree

Reasons you might like Star Driver...

AirCommodore AirCommodore says...

Star Driver and Revolutionary Girl Utena are gorgeous and twisted series about adolescents who attend enormous and complex autonomous boarding schools, where nothing is as it seems.

They share the same writer, and both have a knack for formulaic episodes that actually add to the experience, as opposed to making me think the animators got lazy.

There's also battles, innuendo, and a hyper little animal mascot that I think is supposed to be funny.

DoubleO DoubleO says...

Both Star Driver and Utena share most of the same creative staff, and both have similar basic story ideas: a club based in the school is trying to gain possession of the maidens (albeit for very different reasons), both have battles that take place in secluded areas that seem to exist outside of time and space, and both have a main character that doesn't seem to fit in with what's going on.

paganfire paganfire says...

If you like Star Driver, you will like Utena. Both shows have a secret school soceity running global (or semi-global) events. A main character that is uniquely powerful and powers up quickly. The main reason I think you would like the opposite show is because of the high dramactic theatrics each possess. Each duel is like a play on a stage, qued in with a big real-world change followed by the fight, and completed with an over the top 'kill'. Each of the anime has a Prince and Princess archetype - in the case of Utena almost literally. 

Puella Magi Madoka Magica

Puella Magi Madoka Magica

One night, Madoka has a terrible nightmare – against the backdrop of a desolate landscape, she watches a magical girl battle a terrifying creature, and lose. The next day, the teen's dream becomes reality when the girl – Homura – arrives at Mitakihara Middle School as a transfer student, mysteriously warning Madoka to stay just the way she is. But when she and her best friend Miki are pulled into a twisted illusion world and meet a magical creature named Kyubey, the pair discovers that magical girls are real, and what's more, they can choose to become one. All they must do is sign a contract with Kyubey and agree to fight witches that spread despair to the human world, and in return they will be granted a single wish. However, as Homura's omen suggests, there's far more to becoming a magical girl than Madoka and Miki realize...

3 votes

I agree

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Reasons you might like Puella Magi Madoka Magica...

Nocturnalgloria Nocturnalgloria says...

Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica and Revolutionary Girl Utena are beautiful subservions of the magical girl genre. They are dark fairytales with a sensible approach. Visually stunning, often surreal and never predictable, these anime delve deep into the psyche. Character stereotypes are broken down with gusto. The artwork is very original in both and each anime sports a strong sountrack to back up the visuals.

Utena has a strong sexual element that Madoka lacks but fans of one should try out the other. 

telefool telefool says...

The similarities are striking. Without giving anything away, they could almost be parables of one another. Also the intensity of the emotion portrayed, and the general flow seemed very similar to me.

AnnaSartin AnnaSartin says...

Some would say the magical girl genre has been done to death. Each new series feels like previous shows that came before it, containing the same elements and plots ideas, along with pretty girls that save the world and find romance. If you're tired of Sailor Moon rip-offs or just want something different, Madoka and Utena are the heroines for you. Be aware, however, that both series are deceptively normal in the beginning. They get darker as the story progresses and the characters fight each other more than they fight the enemy. Revolutionary Girl Utena takes most of the series before the protagonist even discovers who the enemy actually is, and with the discovery comes the grim realization that there's often a very fine line between heroes (or damsels in distress) and villains. As for Puella Magi Madoka Magica, don't expect the cute animal mascot to be a bringer of hope and light. Ever seen a magical girl actually try to KILL their mascot? Welcome to the dark, twisted world of Madoka! 

So in closing, if you liked either of these anime series, I'd suggest giving the other a try. A great cure for boredom caused by redundant storytelling and cavity-inducing sweetness. You won't find either here.

Revue Starlight

Revue Starlight

After receiving a mysterious invitation to audition for a coveted spot with, Starlight, a popular musical revue troupe, star-struck contestants begin honing their talents and competing against each other for a chance of a lifetime. Among the hopefuls are childhood friends, Karen and Hikari, who once promised each other that they would take the stage together. With each contender working tirelessly hard to win, it’s the girls’ passionate dedication to their lifelong dream that’ll truly transform their performances as the curtains rise.

3 votes

I agree

Reasons you might like Revue Starlight...

HasseRovdjur HasseRovdjur says...

Both series feature a lot of performative elements, like songs, stage play elements, and dueling. Utena is far more transgressive, even to this day, but Starlight definitely has taken notes. If you want a show about odd school life with fantastic elements such as odd architecture, larger than life duels, and other forms of intrigue. Look no further.

Fans of either would do well to check out the other.

ofall ofall says...

Similar battle set ups, both quite theatric. Also, both imply lesbian attraction (depending on if thats how you want to read it in the case of Revue Starlight). They also both have a repetitive pre-battle sequence.

Gavia Gavia says...

There is no doubt in my mind that Revue Starlight was heavily inspired by Revolutionary Girl Utena.

The main stories of both focuses on the relationship of two girls, with a fictional play/fairytale that ties into the backstory and the underlying plot, and the reason for the duels. Said duels work on a metaphorical level as fights over ideals and philosophy, set to thematically suitable songs, while the combatants wear military inspired outfits.

The shows have similar settings, with a school hiding the fantastical stages of the duels, where magic and giant structures dominate. Both have alike cinematography and uses of symbolism. Further, in both shows there are odd and unexplained animals.

If you liked one and want more, you should certainly check out the other.