The Case Study of Vanitas - Recommendations

Alt title: Vanitas no Carte

If you're looking for manga similar to The Case Study of Vanitas, you might like these titles.

Eikoku Gensou Jouki Tan (Light Novel)

Eikoku Gensou Jouki Tan (Light Novel)

With the advent of the Steam Revolution in the 19th Century, also known as the Second Industrial Revolution, civilization advanced by leaps and bounds through the use of machines driven by large steam engines. In the capital of Great Britain, London, handyman Tsukagami Tobari and alchemist Vincent are always surrounded by trouble. Just what is the true identity behind the Revenants which keep appearing before them in their pursuit of the urban legends surrounding London, the capital of chaos and vibrance?

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Souzou no Eternite

Souzou no Eternite

When I woke up I was in France from a 150 years ago... Asahi, a second high school year student with a bit of a mother complex, suddenly finds himself in the late 19th century? Despite his doubts, he embarks on a journey that could change the history of art!

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Jeep to Wagon

Jeep to Wagon

With 18th century Paris as the stage, in the age of automates, the city is attacked and put under siege by a maniacal Count and his giant automate. It's up to Jeep to take up her family's destiny and call upon the support of her imprisoned uncle to defeat the wicked Count before he destroys Paris and its people!

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Aloette no Uta

Aloette no Uta

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Aka to Kuro: Manga de Dokuha

Aka to Kuro: Manga de Dokuha

Based on the novel Le Rouge et le Noir by Stendhal.

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Sayonara Sorcier

Sayonara Sorcier

In the late 19th century in Paris, Theodorus van Gogh, famous art dealer in Paris and the branch manager of the prestigious Goupil & Cie patroned exclusively by Bourgeoisie clients, seeks to embrace new art talents and techniques. However, the period is full of the prestigious and conservative who think that art belongs solely to the upper echelon of the society whereas commoners are considered as unable to appreciate art. Stating that "Destroying the system from within is more interesting", Thedorus struggles to overcome the obstacle by bringing forth works which depict the truth and daily lives of people which are not acknowledged by the academy.

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Bovary Fujin

Bovary Fujin

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Atlantid

Atlantid

In London of 1882, an injured woman safeguarding a powerful ring is fleeing a dangerous organization. The ring is pickpocketed by a local thief gang, and she passes out from her injuries before being able to recover it. When she awakes, she finds that the young thief gang has taken care of her, and a boy named Sari, who has no memories of his life before the gang took him in five years ago, has the ring. When the organization tracks them down, he wears the ring and unleashes its power. However, he can't take it back off. Now the woman wants him to come back with her to her organization. Will he uncover the secrets of his past?

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Les Miserables

Les Miserables

Introducing one of the most famous characters in literature, Jean Valjean—the noble peasant imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread—Les Misérables ranks among the greatest novels of all time. In it, Victor Hugo takes readers deep into the Parisian underworld, immerses them in a battle between good and evil, and carries them to the barricades during the uprising of 1832 with a breathtaking realism that is unsurpassed in modern prose. Within his dramatic story are themes that capture the intellect and the emotions: crime and punishment, the relentless persecution of Valjean by Inspector Javert, the desperation of the prostitute Fantine, the amorality of the rogue Thénardier, and the universal desire to escape the prisons of our own minds. Les Misérables gave Victor Hugo a canvas upon which he portrayed his criticism of the French political and judicial systems, but the portrait that resulted is larger than life, epic in scope—an extravagant spectacle that dazzles the senses even as it touches the heart.

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The Golden Age of Decadence

The Golden Age of Decadence

Mysterious spirits from the Lethe Valley have invaded 19th century Paris and are stealing words from people. Poetry, however, can defeat these spirits. Blighted by the spirits, famed poet Baudelaire faces a fate worse than death and decides to teach Cocteau, an illiterate orphan, poetry after sensing a hidden talent in him. But, can Cocteau learn poetry when he can’t even read? Why do these spirits from the Lethe Valley steal words from people?

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