Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu

Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu Episode 12 - Untitled

A small rakugo performance takes place at an inn in a hot springs town. Kikuhiko, Konatsu, and Matsuda have all been waiting to see Sukeroku take to the stage. Sukeroku feels the warmth of the audience's love for rakugo, and remembers what it means to be a storyteller. Kikuhiko brings the 7th Generation Yakumo's montsuki for him to wear, and and he performs the story "Shibahama." Time, which had stopped for Sukeroku and Kikuhiko, begins to move again... As it does for Miyokichi, as well.

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Episode 12

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Kids on the Slope

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Lonely Kaoru Nishimi has lost count of how many times he has moved schools thanks to his father's naval career. Newly landed in Kyushu, he finds most of his classmates instantly antagonistic towards him and suspicious of his elite background. Only two other students seem not to mind who he is – the infamously abrasive Sentarou and the gentle Ritsuko...

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Bronia Bronia says

This is a no-brainer recomendation! Both shows smell different from standard anime fare. They have very distinct but very related themes to one another. Shouwa Genroku (SG) is to Rakugo what Sakamichi no Apollon (SNA) is to jazz music, using the arts as a frame for personal growth and coming-of-age friendships between young men and women. Both are graceful depictions of recent-ish historical Japan, SG spanning from the 1930s to the 1970s and SNA rooted in the 1960s. Both shows gracefully explore close friendships formed between young men. (The straight-laced and the ruffian character-types, no less!)

Both anime have a grown-up quality to them that will be appreciated by fans of one or the other. If you watched one and were enthralled by the rich characterization, interactions, and history wrapped up in the tale of mastering and growing into your passion for the arts, I strongly encourage you to take a look at either of these pieces. Both have differences, but at their core are thematically similar and equally pleasurable to watch.

At the time of writing this, SG has only released up to the 7th episode and the content of this rec may not reflect the final product of the anime. I will edit it if need be.

subparalien subparalien says

Look, I'm a sucker for animation style. While slightly different, both of these are lovely art to watch.

Both can be described as slow, sweet, and painful.

Kids on the Slope is a coming of age story, while Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu is multi-generational.

Glass Mask (2005)

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Maya is a dreamy young girl whose clumsiness is matched only by her absent-mindedness. While others have given up on her, the legendary actress Tsukikage sees her hidden potential and offers to take Maya under her tutelage. Maya loves the theatre more than anything, and as there's not much she can do about it at home, she chooses to run away with Tsukikage...

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Lel0uchViBritannia Lel0uchViBritannia says

Both animes show the struggle of a protagonist who is trying to become proficient in the field of their passion. Glass Mask shows the efforts of Maya who is a clumsy girl but she got a natural skill of acting, on the other hand, Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu depicts the struggle of Yotaro to become a good storyteller. Both animes have a good mixture of funny scenes and a serious story.

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Unlike other kids his age, freshman Kurogo Kurusu finds his true passion in kabuki, a form of classical Japanese dance theatre. When he finds out his school doesn’t have a club dedicated to it, he enlists the help of his best friend Tonbo to make one. They'll need at least five members to get things started, however, and together they'll have to win...

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chii chii says

Both shows focus on the old style of Japanese story telling. Shouwa focuses on the story telling part of the stories with one person, where Kabukibu is more of a play with a cast of people. But both share the joys of a preformance with people who are passionate about the stories they tell. Kabukibu focuses on high school club where Shouwa has a grander story to be told over all and focues on adults for the most part. Check one out if you enjoyed the other for sure.