Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu

If you're looking for anime similar to Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu, you might like these titles.

Barakamon

Barakamon

When calligrapher Sei "Seishuu" Handa becomes so enraged at a judge's critique of his work that he actually punches the old man, his father decides that Sei needs to reflect on his behavior and sends him to a remote island to live. Far from the modern conveniences of the city, the moody artist must adapt to his rural environment and his quirky but well-intentioned neighbors. How can he focus on his art when his appliances frequently don't work, his neighbors keep bothering him, and the neighborhood children have turned his house into a secret base?

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Reasons you might like Barakamon...

AnnaSartin AnnaSartin says...

The main characters of Barakamon amd Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu are hyper-focused on perfecting a classical Asian art form. Will appeal to viewers who enjoy anime with a distinctly Japanese feel.

ichigouraharasan ichigouraharasan says...

Family plays an important part in these both.  They both are also about artists learning more of themselves.

ShowerOfSunshine ShowerOfSunshine says...

Both shows revolve around family and both also have a very traditional approach as they both have main characters that are focused on perfecting their art form.

Barakamon is a bit more relaxed than Rakugo.

subparalien subparalien says...

The focus of both of these is the pursuit of traditional art, which is in tension with a desire for community.

Showa Genroku Rakujo Shinjuu also does a lot with narrative elements and storytelling techniques. Barakamon is more just sweet.

House of Five Leaves

House of Five Leaves

Masanosuke came to the city of Edo to prove himself as a warrior, but the man’s lack of confidence is so obvious that he’s perpetually unemployed and can barely afford to eat. So when the mysterious Yaichi offers him a job as a bodyguard - room and board included - the ronin jumps at the chance. But little did he know that his new employer is the head of the Five Leaves, a gang of kidnappers, and that his fees will be paid from the spoils of their crimes! Masanosuke never expected to find his home with a band of criminals, but as he grows more entangled in their world, his dreams of honor begin to fall by the wayside...

3 votes

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Howlorihara Howlorihara says...

Both shows have a similar tone and place emphasis on many of the same aspects.  Both stories do an excellent job at grounding the audience in its time period.  Furthermore, both also focus on a deep and complex relationship between it's male main characters.

ichigouraharasan ichigouraharasan says...

These both deal with more mature and adult storylines and themes.  Unfairness and acceptance in life are central.  They both feel subdued with a sadness but also a sense of peace, with wisdom.

subparalien subparalien says...

Ahhh, yes... The slow build up. soft and beautiful animation, and conflicting moral elements that make you question how you like the characters. If that's your jive, then both these animes are for you.

Mushishi

Mushishi

It isn't unusual for a person to feel that the world around them is strange and has unexpected secrets lying just beyond their sight. However, for most people this is just an occasional sensation that greets them upon awakening or chases them into sleep. For the mushi researcher Ginko, it isn't a feeling at all; it is a knowledge which guides his travels and motivates his life. Found in the cracks between what is conceivable and what is not, are the varied life forms collectively known as mushi. They surround us and affect us, but their intensely different nature makes them unrecognizable to most. Ginko brings these life forms into perspective for the lives of those most affected and most in need of an explanation.

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Reasons you might like Mushishi...

AnnaSartin AnnaSartin says...

Slow paced but well-written anime with a distinctly historical Japanese feel featuring main characters that are dedicated to their craft. One is a healer of sorts that travels the land seeking to aid people with supernatual afflictions, the other is a performance artist who has dedicated himself to reviving people's interest in a style of entertainment that is in danger of being lost in the ceaseless flow of time in an age where new forms of entertainment are replacing the old. Both characters have tragic back stories that propelled them to where they are in the present, but the tone of the two shows are quite different. Even so, they have a somber and at times tragic air to them that more mature veiwers will appreciate.

ichigouraharasan ichigouraharasan says...

Both are subdued and introspective, with wisdom.  They have a great sense of peace and sadness, unfairness and acceptance.

subparalien subparalien says...

The tone and animation have a lot in common. Plus, there are elements of historical Japanese society in both. Mush-shi is fantasy, but has some pretty specific (so I'm told) lore it follows. 

And besides, who doesn't love that subtle, almost nostalgic feeling of pain?

Kids on the Slope

Kids on the Slope

Lonely Kaoru Nishimi has lost count of how many times he has moved schools thanks to his father's naval career. Newly landed in Kyushu, he finds most of his classmates instantly antagonistic towards him and suspicious of his elite background. Only two other students seem not to mind who he is – the infamously abrasive Sentarou and the gentle Ritsuko. Unbeknownst to Kaoru they have a passion for jazz, and they're about to pull him out of his stiff, joyless world into theirs of loose, swinging self-expression. Through friendship and frustration, love and despair, Kaoru will learn that life has a wealth of experiences in store for him!

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Reasons you might like Kids on the Slope...

Bronia Bronia says...

This is a no-brainer recomendation! Both shows smell different from standard anime fare. They have very distinct but very related themes to one another. Shouwa Genroku (SG) is to Rakugo what Sakamichi no Apollon (SNA) is to jazz music, using the arts as a frame for personal growth and coming-of-age friendships between young men and women. Both are graceful depictions of recent-ish historical Japan, SG spanning from the 1930s to the 1970s and SNA rooted in the 1960s. Both shows gracefully explore close friendships formed between young men. (The straight-laced and the ruffian character-types, no less!)

Both anime have a grown-up quality to them that will be appreciated by fans of one or the other. If you watched one and were enthralled by the rich characterization, interactions, and history wrapped up in the tale of mastering and growing into your passion for the arts, I strongly encourage you to take a look at either of these pieces. Both have differences, but at their core are thematically similar and equally pleasurable to watch.

At the time of writing this, SG has only released up to the 7th episode and the content of this rec may not reflect the final product of the anime. I will edit it if need be.

subparalien subparalien says...

Look, I'm a sucker for animation style. While slightly different, both of these are lovely art to watch.

Both can be described as slow, sweet, and painful.

Kids on the Slope is a coming of age story, while Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu is multi-generational.

Ojii-san no Lamp

Ojii-san no Lamp

One day while playing hide-and-seek with his friends, Toichi finds an old oil lamp in the attic. Seeing how entranced his grandson is with the object, the boy's grandfather decides to regale him with a story from fifty years ago. Minosuke is a young orphan who picks up any odd jobs he can in order to scrape a living. After taking on another errand, Minosuke becomes enamored with the various lamps decorating the night-time streets in town. Determined to illuminate his village with this new technology, the strong-willed boy begins selling the items to his fellow villagers and soon becomes a successful merchant. However, the advent of electricity soon spells doom for the humble lamp seller's trade...

2 votes

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XMrNiceguyX XMrNiceguyX says...

These series have a little bit of a different approach in that SHouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu is more focus on romance and it's pacing is much slower than Ojii-san no Lamp.

In essence though, these shows have a similar setting of dealing with new technology (Ojiisan) or new forms of entertainment (Shouwa) and people trying to sturggle with them. This struggle is more pronounced and aimed at westernization and advancement of technology in Ojii-san, Shouwa has this more as an undertone. In general, the feel and setting are extremely similar.

Finally, the structure of the show is similar in that it's an older guy educating the younger generation of the past. In particular a somewhat dying medium in te Shouwe and the fleetiness of technology in Ojii-san no Lamp.

AnnaSartin AnnaSartin says...

Both take place in historical Japan and are stories told by old men recounting the days of their youth. They deal with the reality of how modern progress can overshadow tradition, whether it be cultural or technological.

Nana

Nana

Nana Komatsu is on her way to Tokyo; now she can finally be with her boyfriend after a year of dating long-distance! On the train there, Nana Komatsu meets Nana Osaki – a girl who shares her name but seems to be everything Nana Komatsu is not; cool, street-wise, and a punk rocker. The two hit it off and spend the entire journey getting to know each other, but when they get to Tokyo, circumstance separates them seemingly forever. However, fate is not finished with these two. Whilst hunting for a place to live the two Nanas again cross paths. They decide to share a flat and become best friends in no time. Nana K. must learn to be independent and mature, while Nana O. works on becoming famous with her band; but together, they will learn about love and loss, and the growth that comes with it.

2 votes

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Reasons you might like Nana...

harshrox2 harshrox2 says...

similar slow burning story about 2 charcters , and their relationship which change both of their lives, Josei, etc...

Bronia Bronia says...

Both shows are pretty grown-up looks at adult friendships, dreams, love, and life. Both follow individual(s) who are passionate about what they do but face hurdles in achieving their goals. Both shoes have strong protagonists who perservere through lots of drama. So. Much. Drama. If you like the emphasis on relationships (platonic and romantic) and a general melancholy and a study of characters and the hardship of love (and not just love between people, but love for the arts, etc...)

I can't really put this into words properly, but if you like one show, I encourage you to give the other a try. Due to differences in length, Nana may take you a bit more patience to get into the meat of it- but once you do you'll like what you see if you liked Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu!

Glass Mask (2005)

Glass Mask (2005)

Maya is a dreamy young girl whose clumsiness is matched only by her absent-mindedness. While others have given up on her, the legendary actress Tsukikage sees her hidden potential and offers to take Maya under her tutelage. Maya loves the theatre more than anything, and as there's not much she can do about it at home, she chooses to run away with Tsukikage. The world of theatre is harsh, however, especially for a naive young girl far away from home. While she finds new friends who support her, her mentor has powerful enemies and Maya is often on the receiving end of their ruthless plans. In face of the adversity, Maya must constantly fight to develop her skills to catch up with her unbelievably talented rival, Ayumi, if she hopes to inherit Tsukikage's legendary role: The Crimson Goddess.

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Reasons you might like Glass Mask (2005)...

Lel0uchViBritannia Lel0uchViBritannia says...

Both animes show the struggle of a protagonist who is trying to become proficient in the field of their passion. Glass Mask shows the efforts of Maya who is a clumsy girl but she got a natural skill of acting, on the other hand, Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu depicts the struggle of Yotaro to become a good storyteller. Both animes have a good mixture of funny scenes and a serious story.

Kabukibu!

Kabukibu!

Unlike other kids his age, freshman Kurogo Kurusu finds his true passion in kabuki, a form of classical Japanese dance theatre. When he finds out his school doesn’t have a club dedicated to it, he enlists the help of his best friend Tonbo to make one. They'll need at least five members to get things started, however, and together they'll have to win over an unlikely roster that includes stage actors, martial artists, and band members who aren't into kabuki at all.

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Reasons you might like Kabukibu!...

chii chii says...

Both shows focus on the old style of Japanese story telling. Shouwa focuses on the story telling part of the stories with one person, where Kabukibu is more of a play with a cast of people. But both share the joys of a preformance with people who are passionate about the stories they tell. Kabukibu focuses on high school club where Shouwa has a grander story to be told over all and focues on adults for the most part. Check one out if you enjoyed the other for sure.

March Comes in like a Lion

March Comes in like a Lion

Rei Kiriyama is a 17-year-old professional shogi player who suffers from anxiety, depression, and loneliness. Unwanted by his relatives after he loses his family in an accident, and resented by his adopted family's children, Rei moves into his own apartment in Tokyo to avoid inconveniencing others. He uses his talent at shogi to earn a living, but doesn't take care of himself, and is reluctant to ask others for help. Soon after his arrival, the boy meets the Kawamoto family: a trio of sisters and their grandfather who run a traditional Japanese pastry shop. They too have dealt with pain and loss, but their warmth and loving-kindness are balm for Rei's anguished spirit.

1 vote

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NatsumeJinko NatsumeJinko says...

Both of these series are beautifully made with great story telling and well fleshed out characters. In Sangatsu no Lion, shogi is used as a metaphor and a tool to further enhance the story. In Showa Gen Rakugo, Rakugo is used to do the same thing. Each of these shows touches on darker subjects, such as bullying, loss, depression, illness, and more. If you enjoyed one, you will certainly enjoy the other. 

March Comes in like a Lion 2nd Season

March Comes in like a Lion 2nd Season

Rei continues to work hard at improving his shogi skills, determined to win competitions. When he learns that one of the Kawamoto sisters is facing a crisis, he wants to do everything he can to help, including finding a way to use his shogi winnings to pay them back for all they've done to save him from his pain and loneliness. Meanwhile, Rei's self-appointed rival Nikaidou faces a crisis of his own when his poor health takes a turn for the worse. 

1 vote

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Reasons you might like March Comes in like a Lion 2nd Season...

NatsumeJinko NatsumeJinko says...

Both of these series are beautifully made with great story telling and well fleshed out characters. In Sangatsu no Lion, shogi is used as a metaphor and a tool to further enhance the story. In Showa Gen Rakugo, Rakugo is used to do the same thing. Each of these shows touches on darker subjects, such as bullying, loss, depression, illness, and more. If you enjoyed one, you will certainly enjoy the other.