Iko's avatar

Iko

  • Joined Aug 25, 2013
  • 18 / M

Life on anime

  • 23 Minutes
  • 6 Hours
  • 3 Days
  • 2 Weeks
  • 1 Months
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Anime ratings

  • 5
  • 4.5
  • 4
  • 3.5
  • 3
  • 2.5
  • 2
  • 1.5
  • 1
  • 0.5

100 total

Manga ratings

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  • 4.5
  • 4
  • 3.5
  • 3
  • 2.5
  • 2
  • 1.5
  • 1
  • 0.5

4 total

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Comments

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CaptainSlow says...

Thanks again for your comments.

If I had decided to write a more concise review, I would've absolutely gone into detail about the message/s of Psycho-Pass. Heck, there's enough meaty narrative / analytical content to span a number of essays - it's great just how much the series packs in to its 22-episode run.

But, the "cautionary tale" aspect of Psycho-Pass is, well, nothing new. Sure, it is food for thought but dystopian fiction by the large is written as a warning. Dystopian fiction tends to exaggerate or focus on an aspect or certain aspects of (the author's) society and by taking it to it's least desirable outcome, makes political and/or social commentary.

All the influences mentioned in the Director's Panel at 2013's Comic-Con* were dystopian films commenting on an aspect of (then-)current society and saying "You see this? You don't want it. Stop.". Minority Report played with the idea of the intersection of justice and human's reliance on technology (kind of). Gattaca was a commentary on scientific technologies that were becoming prolific at the time (cloning and the fear of this leading to "designer babies"). Brazil was a (satirical) look at bureaucracy. Blade Runner dealt with a large range of topics such as the human race's effect on the environment and genetic modification.

Not that I'm saying Psycho-Pass did a bad job of delivering its message/s. It's just all too common to the genre. Sure, it interests me, but it doesn't "shock" me as you put it.

Still, the thought of living in a police state ruled by a corporation is off-putting. The thought of living in a nation where your "worth" as a citizen (and as a human) is predetermined by machines that measure your aptitude and mental condition for you is also quite disturbing! D:

* - http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/convention/2013/sakura-con/5

May 11, 2014
CaptainSlow says...

Thanks for your comment on my Psycho-Pass review.

I'm not entirely sure what you meant by me "not understanding anything" about Psycho-Pass, though. From my understading of it, Psycho-Pass is:

  • A psychological science-fiction thriller borrowing heavily (and occasionally ostentatiously) from well-established tropes first popularised by the likes of Orwell and Philip K. Dick. (It's VERY clear in Psycho-Pass where its influences lie, and they surely didn't need the antagonist to name-drop the series influences... it comes off as condescending and pretencious to some viewers including myself.)
  • An examination of the dependence of the modern man on technology, the concept of the perfect "law abiding citizen" (and what happens when outliers are present / not taken into account)... most of the kinds of societal / psychological themes a text set in a futuristic dystopian police state will tend to address. With the amount of themes it did set out to cover, it did a brilliant job of not getting bogged down by them all.

To be honest, I liked it. I really did. After all, I don't give a series or movie an 8.5 / 10 very often! I just felt there were a couple of areas where it was lacking or otherwise off-putting.

But hey, you've already shown with your 5 / 5 rating that you hold it in high regard. Don't let some old tart get in the way of you enjoying what YOU want to. :D

May 9, 2014