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Majo

Alt titles: Witches

Majo Cover Image
  • Vol: 2; Ch: 5
  • 2004
Avg
3.637 out of 5 from 37 votes
Rank #3,345
recommendations

Synopsis:

In a world that is now dominated by religion, few exist who still believe in the old ways of magic and even rarer are those who still practice the ancient arts. Though branded by the majority as heretics, witches still exist across the world and come in many guises. From vengeful sorceresses and a shaman calling upon the spirits to protect her homeland from invading soldiers, to provincial witches in tune with the very world around them, these magic users remain relentlessly shunned by the institutions around them. But while religious heads and pompous rulers see their very existence as a stain on humanity, these witches have more to teach the world than we could possibly know...

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Name Role
Daisuke IGARASHI Artist
Daisuke IGARASHI Author

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Post Name Username Comments Date
25 Days of Manga cassiesheepgirl 4 Nov 22, 11
XxAnimeFreak4EvrXx wants to read Majo
nonononono read Majo at 2 of 2 volumes
pornopis wants to read Majo
zeograd read Majo at 2 of 2 volumes
zeograd is reading Majo manga at 2 of 5 chapters

Recommendations if you like Majo

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Marie no Kanaderu Ongaku

Marie no Kanaderu Ongaku

my list:

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1 person agrees
AirCommodore

The main strength of Majo and The Music of Marie is each's skillful world-building. Both develop very well-realized and fanciful cultures, complete with interesting religions, philosophies, and aesthetics.

Both manga have extremely detailed artwork, and will likely appeal to the same audience.

Mushishi

Mushishi

Mushi are another form of life which live parallel to our own natural world. The source of many myths and superstitions, they exist according to their own natural laws, and can be both beneficial and dangerous depending on circumstances.  Ginko, a traveling mushishi, investigates and helps out wherever the mushi have become a problem. Yet Ginko himself is marked by the creatures he researches, and he carries the weight of his past with him.

my list:

not rated
I agree...
1 person agrees
AirCommodore

If you enjoyed the episodic format and themes of supernatural nature in Mushishi or Majo, you'd be sure to enjoy the other. Both are atmospheric, thoughtful, and sure to appeal to the same audience.

Omoide Emanon

Omoide Emanon

It’s the year 1967 and while the Apollo space missions are getting underway and the US are deploying soldiers to Vietnam, a disenchanted student heads home with a broken heart and an empty wallet. On the trip the self-confessed science fiction fanatic meets a mysterious girl who calls herself Emanon. However, while she may seem like an ordinary girl, Emanon claims that even though her physical body is that of a seventeen-year-old, her mental age is over three billion years old. With memories dating back to the single-celled organisms at the beginning of the world right through to the present day, Emanon curses her ability and wonders why a person with such an encyclopaedic knowledge of history should even exist. Now, as the student talks more with Emanon, he begins to realise that reality truly is stranger than fiction.

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my list:

not rated
I agree...
1 person agrees
AirCommodore

Memories of Emanon and Majo explore fringe phenomena, all while maintaining a thoughtful, subdued mood. Both are very philosophical, and intrigued by eternality and the esoteric. I think they would appeal to the same audience.

Suiiki

Suiiki

The country is in the midst of a heat wave, and with a lower than average rainfall there's a serious water shortage. As such, Chinami Kawamura and the rest of her school's swim club are relegated to running laps instead of swimming them, and in the heat of the mid-day sun, the young girl collapses. While unconscious, Chinami finds herself beside a clear, sparkling river in a deserted rural village where she meets a young boy named Sumio and his elderly father. But even after she awakens and returns to reality, Chinami continues to pass out and visits the same refreshing place - much to her mother's concern...

my list:

not rated
I agree...
1 person agrees
AirCommodore

All of Daisuke Igarashi and Yuki Urushibara's manga are good recs for each other, and Waters and Witches are no exception. Both calmly explore the natural and supernatural, and do a really excellent job of building up their settings.

Tropical Citron

Tropical Citron

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not rated
I agree...
1 person agrees
AirCommodore

Witches and Tropical Citron aren't anything like typical magic/witch stories. Both are much more adult than the whimsical Harry Potter-esque connotations that 'witch' currently has. In Tropical Citron this 'Adult'-ness does mean that it's rather explicit (there's a lot of sex, drugs, and violence), but more importantly, they are both nuanced and thought-provoking series for an adult that enjoys things a bit off-kilter.

Witches is philosophical whereas Tropical Citron is more interested in psychology and the counter-culture.