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Biomega

Biomega Cover Image
  • Vol: 6; Ch: 42
  • 2004
Avg
3.958 out of 5 from 322 votes
Rank #1,825
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Synopsis:

In the future, the N5S infection is slowly spreading throughout the world, turning everyone it contacts into a zombie-like "Drone".  Zouichi Kanoe and his motorcycle AI companion Fuyu Kanoe are sent out by Toha Heavy Industries in order to find humans resistant to infection and save humanity. Competing bio-enhanced agents from the Data Recovery Foundation have different goals, however: how to best extort the situation for their own profit…

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Name Role
Tsutomu NIHEI Artist
Tsutomu NIHEI Author

Community Reviews

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Title Author Score Date
Biomega coffeebreath 7/10 Nov 24, 2012
Biomega seeleprime 4.5/10 Jan 17, 2012
List Title Username Entries Date
Simers Bravo0 7 Feb 6, 2013
Mangas Worth Reading minigorbi 31 Jun 17, 2012
My Favorite Mangas minigorbi 8 Jun 9, 2012
Post Name Username Comments Date
My manga collection Marceus 0 Sep 11, 11
soltys read Biomega at 6 of 6 volumes
lallli is reading Biomega
Narushi stalled Biomega at 2 of 6 volumes
SoylentGreen rated the Biomega manga 3/5 stars
SoylentGreen read Biomega at 6 of 6 volumes

Recommendations if you like Biomega

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Abara

Abara
  • Vol: 2; Ch: 11
  • 2006

Long ago, creatures known as White Guanas manifested and attacked both the population and massive structures that tower above the cities. These terrifying monsters are held at bay only by those who possess the powers of the Black Guana, able to transform their bone structure into armor and weapons at will. Kudou Denji is one such person; he has been hiding under another identity for some time, and is now forced to once more protect the populace against new White Guana manifestations. However, it won’t be easy, as Kudou’s old organization Kegen Hall and others are also aware of his re-emergence...

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1 person agrees
CrazyAce01

Biomega and Abara take place in dystopian worlds created by artist and author Tsutomu Nihei.  They share similar, highly detailed artistic style full of soaring futuristic structures and technology.  Both showcase a lone figure of justice fighting back against frighteningly powerful odds.

BLAME!

BLAME!

Killy is a wanderer in a vast technological wasteland known as the Megastructure. His mission is to find a human with net terminal genes to prevent the collapse of the Netsphere, a virtual realm under control of the Authority. His long, desolate journeys are punctuated by brutal encounters with silicon creatures bent on annihilating humanity; cyborgs intent on infiltrating the Netsphere; and the builders, massive machines that mindlessly add to the chaos of the Megastructure. His only protection is an incredibly powerful gun known as a gravitational beam emitter, which he never hesitates to unleash on his enemies. Will Killy be able to find net terminal genes amidst the scattered human tribes, or is the Netsphere doomed to failure?

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1 person agrees
CrazyAce01

As both manga are written by Tsutomu Nihei, they share many obvious similiarties - such as the highly detailed, dark, ominous art style.  Both manga take place far in the future and involve strange technologies and massive, deserted superstructures where control has long since fallen out of human hands. The adventures bring the main characters through the slowly decaying remains of humanity's greatness, the child of a futuristic dystopia and an endless haunted house.

With technology so advanced, there are less humans than there are "trans"-humans - either genetically or mechanically enhanced versions of the normal homo-sapien.  Both mangas bring a strange sense of slightly disturbed wonder to the reader. That is, wonder at what new situations and creatures await around the next corner, and disturbed as to how wierd, random, and frightning those new things often are.

Perhaps the most defining feature of both manga is the lack of dialogue and obvious plot.  Most manga work to give you the plot and have plenty of dialogue to drive the story along - not a bad thing, but certainly the standard.  Tsutomu Nihei, however, gives mere clues here and their - even understanding the current goals and motivations of the main characters are difficult.  However, this is what makes it so interesting.  You are constantly on the hunt for information, searching for any clue, and all the while you are presented with a simply stunning artistic backdrop in which to do so.  It is incredibly engaging.  Other mangas are read - BLAME! and Biomega are experienced.

Finally, the worlds of Biomega and BLAME! are linked - there are recognizable carryovers and places from each one.  The exact nature of that connection is, itself, another engaging mystery to solve, so I'll not ruin your fun with my opinion.

If you just read one of these manga and enjoyed it, I can't recommend the other enough. I am now a huge Tsutomu Nihei fan.

Dead Heads

Dead Heads

In an unknown time on Earth, the population is infected with a lethal disease; only flies are resistant from its wrath. A countermeasure is in place to quarantine its growth: those with any signs of infection are transported north and their fates are unknown. One day a young man helps an infected woman, putting them both on the run from the authorities...

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1 person agrees
CrazyAce01

Biomega and Dead Heads, by artist and writer Tsutomu Nihei, share a few direct similarities in plot.  Both involve the spread of a deadly disease around the world, a strong, isolated male protagonist, and how the future social infrastructure is dealing with the chaos.

Also obviously similar is the art style and the way the story is told.  Often, many pages rest between conversations, with characters simply depicted taking action or travelling rather than talking.  Tsutomu Nihei has mastered the art of revealing plot by showing it rather than telling it; this style allows for a lot of personal interpretation in the middle of a directed narrative.

NOiSE

NOiSE
  • Vol: 1; Ch: 7
  • 2001

As detective Musubi Susono investigates a series of child kidnappings, her own partner is viciously murdered. But when the investigation takes a brutal turn, she is suddenly confronted by the killer - and his vicious Silicon Creature! Can Susono possibly fight back against these superhuman odds?

my list:

not rated
I agree...
1 person agrees
CrazyAce01

Biomega and NOiSE are both set in dystopian future worlds with powerful and corrupt organizations running things behind the scenes.  They have very similar, highly detailed art styles that focus on dramatic architecture (both are by the artist and author Tsutomu Nihei).  Each one features a lone hero fighting for justice against difficult odds.