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Akira

Akira Cover Image
Avg
4.509 out of 5 from 897 votes
Rank #93
recommendations

Synopsis:

In the aftermath of WWIII Tokyo was re-built as Neo-Tokyo; thirty-eight years later it has become a major metropolis. With the memory of the war and reconstruction fading, corruption, criminality and civil strife are threatening to tear the city apart. The military has a secret project developing humans with psychic powers which they hope will help Neo-Tokyo solve its problems. However, when one of the test subjects escapes and hides with one of the biker gangs plaguing the city, the military does everything it can to recover its test subject and cover up the existence of its research program...

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Anime Relations

Anime Name Type Year Relation More Info
Akira Movie 1988 Anime Adaptation
Name Role
Katsuhiro OTOMO Artist
Katsuhiro OTOMO Author

Community Reviews

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No community reviews found.

List Title Username Entries Date
Would read online Kazaarkat 38 Jan 16, 2014
manga I enjoyed most grsh 43 Sep 17, 2013
All Time Favourite Manga. EatStatic 11 Aug 11, 2013
Post Name Username Comments Date
Blah... bollier 0 Nov 10, 10
soltys read Akira at 6 of 6 volumes
DevilsprayLT rated the Akira manga 4.5/5 stars
DevilsprayLT rated the Akira manga 4/5 stars
viktoset read Akira at 6 of 6 volumes
viktoset read Akira at 6 of 6 volumes

Recommendations if you like Akira

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Domu

Domu
  • Vol: 1; Ch: 6
  • 1980

Residents of a sprawling apartment complex are gripped by terror as dozens of tenants commit suicide over several months. The police are baffled. What no one realizes is that a malicious psychic force has gained control over the complex, and it isn't until a young girl moves in with her family, a girl gifted with her own psychic arsenal, that the source of the chaos is finally revealed...

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I agree...
4 people agree
poppabaggins

Both manga are by the same author and thus share similar art styles.  Additionally, both have strong elements of psychic powers and focus on young characters with great power and responsibility.

HasseRovdjur

Both manga are - basically - about psychic powers and how they affect the world, the people around the users and the users themselves. Lots of destruction and action and, since their done by the same person, a cinematic style that permeates the work. It should perhaps be mentioned that the art style is very similar as well.

EatStatic

Not only are they both by the same author, with a very similar art style, they are also both about psychic powers and have a similar theme in that regard. If you like one, then the other is a must read!

Doomoo

They both have the same feel to them overall and are both manga which raised the bar dramatically. If you happened to like one absolutely check out the other!

BLAME!

BLAME!

Killy is a wanderer in a vast technological wasteland known as the Megastructure. His mission is to find a human with net terminal genes to prevent the collapse of the Netsphere, a virtual realm under control of the Authority. His long, desolate journeys are punctuated by brutal encounters with silicon creatures bent on annihilating humanity; cyborgs intent on infiltrating the Netsphere; and the builders, massive machines that mindlessly add to the chaos of the Megastructure. His only protection is an incredibly powerful gun known as a gravitational beam emitter, which he never hesitates to unleash on his enemies. Will Killy be able to find net terminal genes amidst the scattered human tribes, or is the Netsphere doomed to failure?

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1 person agrees
neutrino

Both series have a similar aesthetic and cyberpunk feel to them.  Often the managaka will cut away to breathtaking scenery of crumbling, futuristic cityscapes.  Both explore similar themes--what defines humanity, and what does technology do to society, but take them in completely different directions, making both an interesting contrast to each other, while still reminiscent of one another.

Cromartie High School

Cromartie High School

Kamiyama Takashi has just enrolled at Cromartie High School due to a promise with an old friend. There's just one problem: it's a school for delinquents! While Kamiyama automatically feels out of place, it doesn't help that his fellow students aren't just ordinary delinquents; there's a gorilla, a robot, and even a mysterious and silent man affectionately known as Freddie. In a school where having a nickname is a must to be taken seriously, where students eat bunches of pencils and where the delinquent leader of the first year students has a crippling case of motion sickness, there might just be a chance Kamiyama could enjoy his new life at Cromartie!

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1 person agrees
DuskFey

Cromartie High School seriously struck me as what Akira would be if the cast were trapped inside a high school instead of gang banging in a post-apocalyptic world. Both mangas focus on guys who kind of scare me, but examine them from completely different angles. If you like tough guys, but can't choose between drama and comedy, never fear! The action of Akira and the randomness of Cromartie should completely fill your quota of maladjusted young men!

Eden: It's an Endless World!

Eden: It's an Endless World!

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1 person agrees
TheMajor5

Akira and Eden are works of art set in a Dystopia/Post-Apocalyptic future where cities are desolate and crumbled.  The people of this future are wild and fear runs rampant.  The cause of such fear is a threat humanity has never faced.  A disease in Eden and a bio weapon named Akira.  Both are uncontrollable and could end up destroying humanity.  Akira and Eden create a intricate web of sub plots and developments that all amount to one goal, stop the threat to humanity.  The art is incredibly detailed and the plot is rich in each series.  If you have yet to read one, then do so.  Masterpieces.

Memories

Memories
  • Vol: 1; Ch: 16
  • 1990

my list:

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1 person agrees
EatStatic

For anyone who likes the work of Katsuhiro Otomo, I think Memories is a must read, a collection of short stories well worth reading. It shares his distinct art style, and while the stories cover many genres, it sometimes has a similar near future setting. You'll find many similarities (maybe small) to Akira throughout, but also a lot of new fresh things too.