Kino's Journey

If you're looking for anime similar to Kino's Journey, you might like these titles. All recommendations are made by Anime-Planet users like you!

Shigofumi

Shigofumi

There are some things that can only be said after death. Aided by a talking staff that thinks it is alive, Fumika delivers Shigofumi, the last words and feelings of the dead in the form of letters, to their addressees. Whether they are letters of apology, revenge, or simply a final farewell, she always brings them to their destination. Delivering Shigofumi is not always an easy job; as some people refuse to believe such things as letters from the dead are possible, while others are afraid of what these letters might contain. But the mail must go through; what the recipients decide to do with it afterwards is up to them.

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Reasons you might like Shigofumi...

hurin hurin says...

The relationship and personalities (and choice of weapon) of Kino/Hermes and Fumika/Kanaka are very similar. Also the main character will spend time philosophizing about the situations they encounter.

etherealam etherealam says...

The main characters are strikingly similar. Each series is about a quiet, unmoving heroine and her talkative (inanimate?) object of a companion. Both heroines are quiet, yet surprisingly carrry a gun. If you liked Kino's Journey, but found it to move a little too slowly for you, give Shigofumi a try! It is less thought-provoking, but its story has more continuity to it than that of Kino's Journey and keeps you coming back for more.

seasong seasong says...

Both of these anime revolve around competent, gun wielding women who act a bit like guys. They have an episodic feel to them, although Shigofumi is less so. Also, neither of the main characters judge what they witness, they simply observe. Overall they both have a similar feel and if you liked one you should like the other.

JAhU JAhU says...

Both Shigofumi and Kino no Tabi have a similar main character. Fumika and Kino are both silent girls with somewhat similar attitude towards world and the philosophy of not getting involved in events surrounding them. Both are accompanied in they journeys\\work by a talking item (Kino's motor an Fumika's staff). Although Shigofumi takes place in modern japan and Kino no Tabi takes place in a fantasy world, they both contain interesting (but different) drama. If you liked one, you should check the other one as well.

P.S. Did I mentioned that both are quite grim?

convexity convexity says...

Undoubtedly, those who loved Shigofumi will love Kino's Journey as well, and vice versa. First released as light novels of the same names, both Shigofumi and Kino's Journey feature rather similar main characters -- Fumika and Kanaka, Kino and Hermes. The two girls and the two others are each in a relationship of a wanderer and a guide; the girls roam about, from people to people, from place to place, with their purposes. They have their personal history revealed along the way, but for most of the story, they live the life of wise observers:  indifferent but thoughtful ones who can reflect upon the very question of human nature.

Cetonis Cetonis says...

If there is any "spiritual successor" to Kino's Journey out there, it is Shigofumi. Each follows an observer and her inanimate partner through a variety of individual stories, most involving some sort of social commentary, irony, message, etc. It's worth noting that Shigofumi has more of an overarching plot than Kino, with a few recurring characters and a dedicated development of Fumika's backstory over time. Whether this is ultimately for the better or not is up to the individual, but in the end anyone who enjoyed one of these series should surely find the other to their liking as well.

AirCommodore AirCommodore says...

Shigofumi is like Kino's Journey 2.0, with a similarly-characterized quiet/contemplative girl with a gun and her rather animated inanimate companion. Additionally, each deals with similar themes about humanity in a pseudo-episodic format.

snivets snivets says...

Both shows are heavy on philosophy and themes of morality when humans find themselves in extreme situations. The heaviness of the themes is lightened by the amusing interaction of a chatty non-human object and a stoic girl who prefers observing to participating in events she encounters.

Hi no Tori

Hi no Tori

From swordsmen to robots, from ancient tribal cultures to civilizations that reach the stars, there is one force that dominates all others: life. From birth to death, and rebirth again, it is life that permeates the soul and opens up to us the mysteries of the universe. Within this tale of the phoenix and those who would be touched by its beauty, we are shown the joys and tragedies that life sometimes hands us, and what we, as humans, must do to survive...

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Reasons you might like Hi no Tori...

NoSanninWa NoSanninWa says...

Both Kino no Tabi and Hino Tori are amazing studies of human nature. Each of them is composed of a series of largely unconnected segments which tell a complete story. In each of these works the story isn't about the title character who moves from one story to another, but about the milieu they are in. Still, none of these similarities are the reason that a liking for one of these implies that you would like the other. The real reason is that both of these stories take place on a level that is beyond storytelling. They are poetry.

sothis sothis says...

This is one of my few recommendations that seems to have no basis, no similarity, and no merit, except my own personal recommendation. Having seen both of these masterpieces, I strongly think that if you liked one, you'd like the other. I can't give you a good reason why... perhaps it was the studying of humanity in such detail, tragedy, and hope? Just trust me... this out.

Omurqi Omurqi says...

The one, big label to give both Kino's Journey and Hi no Tori, is "thought provoking". The individual stories have some value of their own, but the only thing that justifies a high score on both is how they present the viewer with ever-difficult questions about mankind and nature. Don't go into either shows expecting smooth, easy entertainment to brush off the day. If you're in the mood for something a little more philosophical however, don't miss out on either of these titles.

MugiwaraMarius MugiwaraMarius says...

Both these episodic series explore various questions about life through their various stories. The varried settings in each series can be seen to represent a different aspect of life or society and is used as a framing device to explore a specific point or question.

Tori is faster paced than Kino but it's also not quite as deep or as detailed. What Tori it lacks in nuance it makes up for in it's more varried settings.

Although I enjoyed Kino's Journey more overall I think if you liked one series then the other is definitely worth checking out.

Allison and Lillia

Allison and Lillia

It is the year 3287, and the countries of Roxche and Soux-Beil have been feuding for one hundred and thirty years. In the country of Roxche, the young air force pilot Allison has just reunited with her childhood friend Wil; and together, they are about to embark on a grand adventure. Whether it's ending the war between the countries with the help of a legendary treasure, traveling into hostile territory, or helping restore a princess's right to the throne, Allison and Wil will complete their missions with kindness and honor.

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Reasons you might like Allison and Lillia...

sothis sothis says...

It seems a given to make this recommendation, given that Kino and Allison were made by the same person; it shows, greatly. Both anime are slice-of-life stories with somewhat of a moral twist (more so in Kino). I found Kino to be the far more compelling of the two.

Merryberry Merryberry says...

It does seem that stories that are gentle and slow in their telling appear to be a common trait with these two series. As such you are drawn into the stories with relative ease and enjoyment, resulting in you able to sit back and relax. Well worth watching both in their adventures.

JAhU JAhU says...

Both anime are based on books by Keiichi Sigsawa. Probably because of this they have a similar feel, though adaptation of Allison and Lillia into anime didn't go equally well as adaptation of Kino's Journey. Anyway if you seen one you should definitely check the other.

chii chii says...

If you are looking for something slow yet still interesting to watch look no further than these 2 titles. Allison and Lillia has a tiny bit more of a plot than Kino's Journey but both have adventures traveling across a lot of land exploring their vast worlds. check one out if you enjoyed the other

Daughter of Twenty Faces

Daughter of Twenty Faces

Eleven-year-old Chizuko Mikamo is a victim; she is aware that her cruel relatives have been slowly poisoning her, but she can't do anything to escape her fate except starve herself. Luckily for her, the infamous thief, Twenty Faces, has arrived to steal her household's most valuable treasure: Chizuko herself. Alongside Twenty Faces, Ken, Skipper and the rest of the gang, Chizuko travels to exotic lands and strange places in search of valuable treasure. But, as she soon discovers, there's much more to the mysterious Twenty Faces than she could ever have bargained for...

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Reasons you might like Daughter of Twenty Faces...

Omurqi Omurqi says...

While both stories do have elements in common (such as a certain seriousness), the only reason I'm making this recommendation is based on the fact that both Kino and Chiko have very similar personalities. They are both young girls who are surprisingly cool and collected for their age. They are bright, sharp and agile children with an amazing ability to learn and adapt. Chiko does have more emotional depth than Kino, but both characters are a joy to follow.

DeathCrunch DeathCrunch says...

Both stories star sheltered, yet incredibly mature, young female leads on their journeys to discover the world and themselves.

RedCrossRobbery RedCrossRobbery says...

Kino's Journey and Daughter of Twenty Faces may not have similar themes in terms of "plot", they do both have very similar main characters. Strong, quiet, brilliant young females who really stand out as original, and interesting characters.

Sianeka Sianeka says...

Both Kino's Journey and The Daughter of Twenty Faces have a similar feel to the story and atmosphere, and it isn't just because the two lead protagonists in each are resourceful young females.

Both girls are coming-of-age while traveling and both like to remain semi-detatched from the world, participating while observing. Kino's goal is to visit and learn about all kinds of new people, customs and places while not involving herself; Chiko's motto in Twenty Faces is "look, listen, and think for yourself" as she studies the people and situations around her.

Both anime share a serious undertone and bigger underlying themes.  If you enjoyed one, I think you'd also enjoy checking out the other.

Serial Experiments Lain

Serial Experiments Lain

"I have only abandoned my body, I still live here" - are the words emailed to friends of Chisa, several days after her death by suicide. As Lain delves deeper into the world of the "Wired" (also known as the internet), the line between it and reality becomes more and more unclear. Close the world, open the nExt.

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Reasons you might like Serial Experiments Lain...

forfeit forfeit says...

For me, Serial Experiments Lain, Haibane Renmei and Kino no Tabi are considered the “philosophers triad”, not only because they make you think with their exotic and original plot, but also because the story looks like it was made out of dreams, or nightmares. They share the fact that the story is not exactly what you think it is, the puzzle will never get finished and information will always be missing, the characters are original and develop by learning about the surrounding world, and the animation looks alike, mostly because of the colors.

hurin hurin says...

Kino and Lain are 'food for the brain' types of anime, forcing you to think about what you're watching but both avoid the trap of becoming obscure.

AverageShinigami AverageShinigami says...

A deceptively calm atmosphere is what unites these two series. Lain's eerie stillness is interspersed with psychedelic and confusing trips to another world, while Kino's idyllic landscapes and fairy tale charm are mixed with horrifying tales of man's missteps. Both contemplate the world philosophically and offer no clear solutions to the difficult problems under study, but these ponderings are very different in nature and focus. Kino is also significantly more optimistic than Lain.

The main characters of the shows resemble one another in their calmness and silent strength. The character design of both protagonists is remarkably good and they are both very likable in their own ways.