Digimon Season 3: Tamers

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MonjaElisa's avatar By MonjaElisa on May 29, 2011

Digimon Tamers is the third anime in the Digimon series. The Story is an Alternative version of the First two seasons and everything will be more advanced and digital than things were in the first seasons.

Digimon Tamers is a story that comes with Humour, Heartbreak, Cruelty and much drama.
The story as it doesn't take place after the first two seasons revolves around Takato Matsuda who has always been a majorfan and a regular player of the Digimon Cardgame as this is the only relation people has of Digimon in the real world.
One Day Takato stumbles upon a blue card that will turn out to change his destiny. Drawing pictures of the Digimon he would like to have if Digimon existed in reality he eventually ends up with a Digivice with a unhatched digi-egg inside..

This is the start of Takato's long journey full of struggles along with his new friends who will help him out on a mission. One mission so obvious will turn out to create the biggest catastrophy in the Human and Digimon world history ever.
Sacrifices will have to be made repeatedly.

This is an Anime Everyone should see, Despite being fans of the first two seasons or not. Really Recommended..

10/10 story
9/10 animation
10/10 sound
10/10 characters
10/10 overall
Rollo's avatar By Rollo on Jan 22, 2012

To put it simply, as a mass produced franchise series for kids this is not going to be an "amazing" series.  The plot is sappy and like the characters, transparent.  On the other hand it is an exception, probably due to the fact that this season was written by Chiaki J. Konaka. This is the same guy who is known for some big, important animes such as Texhnolyze, Hellsing, Bubblegun Crisis, The Big O, etc...  As with his other material, the feel is unusually dark and disturbed for what is supposed to be a show for young people.   

Hidden underneath cliche morals about friendship n' crap, is some sophisticated, interesting material.  For instance, how subtle jokes inform mature audiences about one teacher comically hitting on another during a class camp out (and getting rejected).  Also, the parts concerning the hackers, unlike many other shows, are in fact not completely made up stuff.  When they start talking about quantum mechanics, some of the information about faster than light travel, higgs fields, and such is legit.

In summary, this is an anime that will satisfy nostalgeia, and provide an occational, often humorous, surprise for older audiences.  I will most not discount this anime as it far exceeds its bounds as "generic" franchise series (really I think its about Bandai wanting to sell merch, but oh well, guess I'm a sucker for nostalgia, still have my cards and minitures lying round somewhere). 

4/10 story
3.5/10 animation
5/10 sound
5.5/10 characters
6/10 overall
roriconfan's avatar By roriconfan on May 13, 2012

This is the third Digimon season and its first spin-off. Most of its elements have remained the same so please read my review on the earlier seasons before reading this one. I will only be mentioning the differences amongst them.

The production values improved a lot. The new Digimons look way more detailed and interesting, there are a lot more special attacks and visual effects and even the 3D models no longer feel crude. Voice acting feels more mature because of the darker story and the music themes are good and dynamic.

The scriptwriters decided to have alternative universes hereon, since they realized how they had nothing to add with direct sequels. So the story has an entirely new cast and the events of the previous seasons are presented as the story of a video/card game. Even the Digimons in this season are truly presented to be just a game. The kids play card games and videogames with them, as if they are just a normal marketing franchise. So one day they literally start to pop out of the virtual world into our own and the heroes need to defend their town from the untamed monsters by using their own tamed ones. Later on they go to the Digiworld, where they confront the major powers that rule it and a mysterious force that destroys life and plans to expand its reach to their world as well.

At first, I thought the producers debunked the series to a lame card game advertising series, like Yu-Gi-Oh! or Duel Masters. You know, another scam to brainwash kids into buying the game. But later on it becomes far darker and complicated than it lets you believe at first. First, the tamed Digimons need the kids for using cards that boost their capabilities in battles and absorb their enemies to grow stronger, like leveling-up creatures in videogames. But later, they no longer stick to that premise and act differently, depending on circumstances. There are also some really good plot twists in here, like secret organizations, mega-corporations and hacker experts, all trying to gain and recover from a canceled videogame project. What more to ask?

Also, this season does not repeat the mistake of the second and focuses on its characters, fleshing them out considerably. Finally, we have backdrop stories; both the kids and several Digimons have a clear and distinguished past and identity. Even the Digimons acquire separate personalities instead of feeling like vague extensions of their masters. They also mature as the story progresses; not too much but enough to tell the difference. And adding several adults as secret agents and hackers gave the entire cast more variety and realism. It’s no longer about a bunch of kids saving the world, it is now about every age group trying to do their best in this crisis. Being character-centered along with more mysterious, way scarier, with bearable teen drama and perplexing plot it becomes very good in overall. I also didn’t find any plot holes in it, so it even feels plausible and not convenient.

In all, it is not just a marketing trick, nor one of the same as before. It is better on every section than the previous two seasons and I recommend it as a very good children’s adventure.

And now for some excused scorings.

ART SECTION: 8/10
General Artwork 2/2 (looks good)
Character Figures 1/2 (generic)
Backgrounds 2/2 (basic but fitting with the feeling of the series)
Animation 1/2 (basic)
Visual Effects 2/2 (flashy)

SOUND SECTION: 7/10
Voice Acting 2/3 (corny but fitting with the feeling of the series)
Music Themes 3/4 (not great but fitting with the feeling of the series)
Sound Effects 2/3 (ok I guess)

STORY SECTION: 8/10
Premise 1/2 (typical)
Pacing 1/2 (mostly formulaic but does have its plot twists)
Complexity 2/2 (collector’s urge)
Plausibility 2/2 (they did a fine job)
Conclusion 2/2 (satisfactory)

CHARACTER SECTION: 9/10
Presence 1/2 (generic)
Personality 2/2 (cheesy but well established)
Backdrop 2/2 (they all have a past)
Development 2/2 (most develop a lot)
Catharsis 2/2 (satisfactory)

VALUE SECTION: 8/10
Historical Value 2/3 (very famous franchise)
Rewatchability 2/3 (high if you liked its turn around)
Memorability 4/4 (amongst the most memorable of its kind)

ENJOYMENT SECTION: 8/10
Art 1/1 (looks good)
Sound 1/2 (sounds ok)
Story 3/3 (they did a fine job with what they had)
Characters 3/4 (I liked them for being more than caricatures)

VERDICT: 8/10
Best Digimon season of them all.

8/10 story
8/10 animation
7/10 sound
9/10 characters
8/10 overall
Ehecatl's avatar By Ehecatl on Mar 11, 2013

Out of the anime I watched as a child, this is the one that stuck with me.  I think the reason this series had such an impact on me, and still does, is that even now it still holds up as a pretty solid anime, especially for a kids' show.  A lot more care was put into the story and characters than in the other seasons of Digimon, or something like Pokemon. 

Story: 8/10

The story of Digimon Tamers diverges from the pattern of Digimon Adventure and Digimon Adventure 02, in that it takes place mostly in the real world, and not in the digital world.  It has done away with the first 2 seasons; it takes place in a universe where they only existed as a TV show and some children's games.  The story is separated into several arcs that run together quite nicely.  It starts off with a sort of monster of the week format, but each episode contributes something to the characters' development, and there are some that deal with an ominous government agency that provides the series with some rather dark atmosphere.  Once the show gets to the digital world, things become a little more complicated, and the climax presents us with an exciting and satisfying conclusion. 

This series deals a lot in the relationship between parents and children, and the plot involves the parents fairly often as well.  Kids lying to their parents and parents lying to their kids is something you'll see often.  This, I think, helps to set it apart from other kids' anime, like Pokemon or the earlier seasons of Digimon, which can be seen, on occasion, trying to provide a good message for children.  Digimon Tamers is not a show with a moral for kids to pick up; rather, it's tellling its story while staying appropriate for a child audience. 

That said, the need to remain appropriate for children, combined with the fact that the creators were ordered to advertise the card game in this show, does tend to hold the story back a little.  Still, I think it's a good story that some people will really enjoy.

Characters: 9/10

The characters are one of the most important parts of this show.  In the earlier seasons of Digimon, we got fun but ultimately stereotypical characters whose backstories were only lightly touched upon, and who only learned very simple lessons over the course of the show.  Not so with Digimon Tamers; the size of the main cast has been cut down from previous seasons to only three main characters, making use of the show's length to add new characters when appropriate.  This allows it to really go into the main characters' backstories, how they got to be the way they are, and what problems they have to face because of it.  As stated before, this is not limited to the child characters.  The adults play a significant role in this as well; by the end, they're almost as important as the main characters.  The Digimon themselves receive the same treatment.  If there were any reason to watch this show, it would be to see how the characters operate over its course. 

Animation: 6/10

The animation is nothing spectacular, but is above average.  The action scenes between Digimon look good, and you can tell that special care went into the scenes that were particularly climactic; there are a couple of rather epic moments that the art and animation are able to capture really well.  If I had a complaint, it would be that a few of the Digivolution sequences make use of pretty awkward CG. 

Sound 6/10

The sound is the same as the animation; not great, but more than adequate.  It contributes at the right moments.  Unlike the animation, it doesn't have the possibility of suffering from bad-looking CG. 

Enjoyment 10/10

I am enamored with this show, I make no effort to hide it.  I'm a big Digimon fan, but this is the series of Digimon I've rewatched the most, and the only one I still watch.  I would recommend this to anyone, though I understand that not everyone has the time for a 51 episode kids show.  If you're a fan of sci-fi, or character-centric anime, you would probably like it.

Overall: 9/10

8/10 story
6/10 animation
6/10 sound
9/10 characters
9/10 overall